Corralling the Peeps

By on Oct 17, 2015 in Pathways, Posts | 2 comments

I rarely write in verse form but a while ago this “poem” came to me in a unified form and I share it today after editing it a bit. I think the image of meditation and rounding up the peeps during meditation is helpful.

peeps

The Peeps

I breathe in
wonderfully alert and alive.
In deeply.
Out slowly.
Returning to who I am.

Then
a thought crops up
scurrying across
the chicken coop of my mind.
Then another
and another
and another.
Then
I return to the breath.
Corralling the peeps
all of them
For a few seconds
In the coop of breath.
In deeply.
Out slowly.
Resting in the sacred rhythm.
Resting in the containment.

And
another scurries out
and another.
Over and over again.
arrrghhhhgghh!!!!
But
you know
peeps
need love too!

Sometimes that is just what meditation feels like; corralling the “uncorrallible.” And there is no benefit to being less than loving toward all experiences even these peeps.

peeps2Most of the thoughts waddling through are no more helpful than the candied version of peeps made from marshmallow, sugar, gelatin, food dye and corn syrup. Scientists from the University of Georgia have conducted experiments exposing these things to boiling water, liquid nitrogen, diluted sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide with little result. Like thoughts themselves they are rather indestructible and like thoughts a diet principally of either of them is good for us.

    2 Comments

  1. I love this post! I tend to experience “peep overpopulation.” I suppose that this just means the corral needs to be large enough to accommodate them all. (And, did you mean to say that a diet principally of either peeps or thoughts is NOT good for us?)

    Kerri

    October 20, 2015

  2. Kerri
    Thank you so much for your comment. I really like the image of “peep overpopulation” which is exactly what I must have had proof reading the last sentence before posting it. Yes, the sentence is supposed to read “a diet principally of either peeps or thoughts is NOT good for us.” Thank you for noticing the error.
    Graham

    C. Graham Campbell

    October 21, 2015

Leave a Reply to Kerri Cancel reply